I Am A Drummer Tee
I Am A Drummer Tee
I Am A Drummer Tee
I Am A Drummer Tee
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  • Load image into Gallery viewer, I Am A Drummer Tee
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, I Am A Drummer Tee
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, I Am A Drummer Tee

I Am A Drummer Tee

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I AM A DRUMMER is our homage to the Memphis Sanitation Strike of 1968.
Memphis sanitation workers went out on strike on February 12, 1968, demanding recognition for their union, better wages, and safer working conditions after two trash handlers were killed by a malfunctioning garbage truck.

We designed this in an effort to promote these same beliefs: better wages and safer working conditions.

Memphis sanitation workers, the majority of them Black, went out on strike on February 12, 1968, demanding recognition for their union, better wages, and safer working conditions after two trash handlers were killed by a malfunctioning garbage truck.

As they marched, striking workers carried copies of a poster declaring “I AM A MAN,” a statement that recalled a question abolitionists posed more than 100 years earlier, "Am I Not A Man and A Brother?".

Martin Luther King Jr. joined the cause, speaking to a crowd of 6,000 in late March and returning on April 3rd to deliver one of his most famous speeches, “I’ve Been to the Mountaintop.” King placed the strike in a larger context, declaring, “The masses of people are rising up."

King was assassinated at Memphis’s Lorraine Motel the next night, just one day before a massive rally was planned. On April 8, four days after King’s assassination, his widow, Coretta Scott King, led some 20,000 marchers through the streets of Memphis, holding copies of another poster that read, “HONOR KING: END RACISM!” The strike ended on April 16, with the city agreeing to union recognition and raises.

Nobody knows for sure how the sign idea originated. Supposedly it was a collaboration of union officials and civil rights activists. About 400 posters were printed in a church print shop.



This means the two major unions for musicians cater primarily to major-label vocalists — effectively the top 1% of artists — and the instrumentalists who work mostly with orchestras or in opera or musical theater. A large chunk of artists falls through the gap between those two constituencies — no one on an indie label, for example, or the multitudes of unsigned artists striving to make it big. “The majority of working musicians may never interface with a major label,” says Kevin Erickson, the director of the Future of Music coalition, a non-profit think tank that fights to “put artists first.” “The diversity of practices and business models presents a challenge for traditional modes of organizing.”

• 100% combed ring-spun cotton
• Fabric weight: 4.3 oz/yd² (145.8 g/m²)
• 32 singles
• Pre-shrunk


This product is made especially for you as soon as you place an order, which is why it takes us a bit longer to deliver it to you. Making products on demand instead of in bulk helps reduce overproduction, so thank you for making thoughtful purchasing decisions!

Size guide

  BODY LENGTH (inches) BODY WIDTH (inches)
XS 27 17 ½
S 28 19
M 29 20 ½
L 30 22
XL 31 24
2XL 32 26
3XL 33 28
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